Veridos and GSI Sertracen partner on Costa Rica ePassport solution

Veridos and GSI Sertracen partner on Costa Rica ePassport solution

Veridos, a world-leading provider of integrated identity solutions, and the Latin American systems integrator GSI Sertracen have announced the signing of a major contract with Costa Rica. The General Department of Migration and Immigration of the Republic of Costa Rica has entrusted Veridos and GSI Sertracen with the supply, installation, and implementation of next-generation electronic passports and the personalization system. Veridos will also supply its CLIP ID solution for outstanding color image performance.

The contract between the Costa Rican government and Veridos along with GSI Sertracen will allow the country to elevate its ID technology thanks to the delivery of ePassports with a polycarbonate data page as well as the software and hardware for personalization. The ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) compliant passports include Veridos’ CLIP IDhigh-tech color personalization technology to ensure the ultimate color brilliance of each ePassport holder’s image, improving visual verification. CLIP ID creates vibrant color photos using the advantages of both laser engraving and ink-jet printing.

Marc-Julian Siewert, CEO of Veridos, says: “We are very honored to have been chosen by the General Department of Migration and Immigration to be part of the modernization of their ID landscape. Together with GSI Sertracen, we will successfully transform the current machine-readable passport system to a fully-fledged biometric travel document solution. Costa Rica is one of the most advanced countries in Latin America and their passports with our cutting-edge CLIP ID color picture solution will soon reflect that, too.”

Costa Rica to adopt ePassport

Costa Rica to adopt ePassport

Costa Rica’s immigration service, the Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería (DGME), will issue a new biometric passport, reports local media.

The biometric passport will cost US$75 plus ¢250 colones, and is valid for ten years, reports Q Costa Rica. It is a document that has a chip with biometric data, as well as personal information. The document includes the latest mobility trends at a global level, since its security measures prevent the falsification and alteration of information.

Each personalized chip provides advantages in cases of loss or theft of the document, and would allow the eventual speeding up of border procedures when traveling, due to its easy verification, opening the doors to Costa Ricans to a greater possibility of flexibility in terms of travel.

The biometric data will now consist of fingerprints of the ten fingers (previously there were only two fingers), a passport number different from the cedula (identity card) and personal data, such as the self-perceived gender of the Costa Rican people who made the change in the Civil Registry.

Among the main differences between the new biometric document and the conventional passport used up to now is its validity period, which goes from six to ten years.

The new passports will have holograms, visible figures in intaglio prints, 3D drawing, latent image, “Esencial” (Essential) mark, security polycarbonate sheet with personal information, and other features.

“The realization of this project has been an arduous process for our institution, it has been thanks to the perseverance of the officials of the DGME that make up the Bicentennial Biometric Passport Project team, that today, in an emotional moment, we disconnected the system to make way for technological modernization processes with biometrics and digitization,” said Raquel Vargas, Director of Immigration.